The Yard in Summer

One of the common things you'll hear when you move into a new property, is to leave the yard alone for the first year. Of course keep it cleaned up, but not to start planting or planning until the following spring. It's important to learn what comes and goes throughout the growing season, the path of the sun across the property, where water pools after it rains.

We have enough to do inside the house without worrying about the yard, so it's been kind of relaxing just to study the landscape. We have a flowering tree that comes in first on the north side of the yard, but still don't know what it is. It came in early May, along with the Pear tree, and what we learned was a Black Birch tree. We have a massive Catalpa tree that didn't fully come in until early June, and flowered in mid-June. We knew we had a series of rose bushes throughout the yard, but didn't know they were Rosa Mundi until they began to flower. The bud looks like a rose, but the bloom looks like a smaller peony.

Rosa Mundi Bush

Rosa Mundi Bush

We also have a few hydrangea bushes, that have not yet flowered, but I attribute that to the fact that we have watered nothing, laid no mulch, or pruned anything. We have a few daffodils, and bleeding hearts in the yard, also some crocus. 


The biggest growth is a large mass of lilies that had been growing since late March, however, thinking they were a spring flower, I expected them to bloom earlier, but here we are in the first days of summer, and they started to bud and pop, very lovely flowers. We could have about a hundred blooms.

Lilies

Lilies

Also, I know that last year, the red bartlett pears were very small on our tree, and it looks like again, they will continue to be so. I expect a few hundred from this tree. I have pruned some of it, but haven't mulched or fertilized, and that could contribute to the smaller than desired fruit. I'll follow up with a strategy next spring, though may prune again late fall this year.

Close up of the pear tree

Close up of the pear tree

In the yard are three dead looking peach trees I have cut down. I know there are successful trees in the city, but don't think this is an appropriate climate for that struggle, and I don't love peaches as I do pears. I do plan to hold a bonfire this fall and burn the wood from the trees. We have three unhealthy arborvitae trees, that I intend to relocate elsewhere in the yard, and maybe in planters on the patio. They might benefit from attention.